Facebook engineers fired for violating user privacy

A new book published by Cecilia Kang and Sheera Frankel, reporters for the New York Times, reveals troubling details about behind the scenes of Facebook’s security. an excerpt from An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebook’s Battle for Domination (An Ugly Truth: Inside the Battle for Facebook Domination in a Free Translation) released by The Telegraph shows …

Facebook engineers fired for violating user privacy

facebook-fired-more-than-52-engineers-who-violated-user-privacy

facebook-fired-more-than-52-engineers-who-violated-user-privacy

A new book published by the New York Times reporters Cecilia Kang and Sheera Frankel reveals disturbing details about Facebook’s security behind the scenes. The Telegraph's An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebook's Battle for Domination (An Ugly Truth: Inside the Battle for Facebook Domination in a Free Translation) shows that it is common for engineers to access users’ private information. 
 According to the book, between January 2014 and August 2015, more than 52 engineers on social networks, including those who monitored their meetings, terminated their work due to a data breach. Although most people simply looked at the information, one of them accessed location data to find out where the person travelling with them in Europe decided to stay after the two had a fight. 
 In another case, an engineer of the company used his administrator privileges to access the profile of a woman he had dated a few days ago, but the woman no longer responded to his messages. Information that can be easily obtained includes date of birth, all messages sent and received on Facebook Messenger, photos posted (and deleted), and advertising materials assigned by social networks, including age groups and political leanings. The same is true of lifestyle. For example, the real-time location of the user.